This week�Learn how The BRAIN can be your virtual newsstand!

In this issue: 1. Browse the latest issue of a magazine or journal online @ The BRAIN, 2. New online archive of Hamilton Spectator articles launched, 3. The Hamilton Spectator @ The BRAIN

Browse the latest issue of a magazine or journal online
You no longer have to run down to the newsstand to browse the latest issue of some magazines (for example, Maclean’s or Time). Now you can simply surf over to The BRAIN’s databases collection to access the most recent issue of popular magazines and journals online. Two of the Library’s databases offer this functionality: EBSCOhost and ProQuest. Below are short instructions on how to use this handy feature in both databases.

How to search for a particular magazine or journal title in EBSCOhost:
1. Select any EBSCOhost database from the Library’s Databases page. (These databases have “EBSCO” in the Producer column.)

2. All of the EBSCOhost databases to which the Library subscribes will display. To find out which database contains the magazine you would like to read, select the “Title List” link under any database name.

3. In the “Browse for” box, type the title of the journal you would like to read and click the “Browse” button.

4. Select the title of your choice.

5. The “Publication Overview” will appear with links to all of the issues available. Select a year and the volumes for that year will appear. Select a volume to display all of the articles for that volume. (Please note that not every title in EBSCOhost is available in full-text. This is due to agreements between the periodical publisher and EBSCOhost. If the title you would like is not available in full-text, a print copy may be available in the Library…check for a note in the results list that indicates if the title is available in print in the Library.)

6. Once you find out which database contains your preferred title, you can search for the latest issue in a more direct way the next time. Here’s how:
a. Choose the database that contains your preferred title from the list of EBSCOhost databases.
b. The search page displays. Scroll down to the Published date edit boxes. Enter the month and year of the issue you’d like to read. Enter the same dates for both sets of boxes if you would like to read only one issue. (For example, to read only the October 2003 issue, enter October 2003 in both boxes.)
c. Enter the title in the Publication edit box.
d. Select the Search button.
e. All of the articles for that issue will display.

How to search for a particular magazine or journal title in ProQuest:
1. Select a ProQuest database from the Library’s Databases page. (ProQuest databases have “ProQuest” in the producer column.)

2. If you aren’t sure if your title is available in the database, select the “Publications Search” tab from the top of the screen.

3. Enter the title in the edit box and select the Search button.

4. Scroll to find your title. Select the appropriate title link.

5. All of the issues available for that title will appear. Select the issue of your choice and a list of articles for that issue will display.

6. If you are sure that your preferred title is available in the database, you can search for it directly:
a. From the Advanced Search page, scroll down to the Date range edit boxes. Enter the date of the issue you wish to read. Enter the same dates for both sets of boxes if you would like to read only one issue. (For example, to read only the October 2003 issue, enter 10/01/2003 in both boxes.)
b. Enter the title in the Publication Title edit box.
c. Select the Search button.
d. A list of articles from that issue will appear.
Please note that while some titles are available online before they hit the newsstands, others are under an embargo period. This means that the publisher of the title does not allow the title to be accessed electronically for a specified period of time, for example one year. Generally, scholarly journals such as Nature or Science are not available for a specified amount of time while popular magazine titles such as Maclean’s, Time or The Economist are available immediately upon publication (but this is not a hard and fast rule.) If the title is embargoed, a note will indicate this and abstracts may be available for the articles in the latest issue.

2. For history buffs: new online archive of Hamilton Spectator articles launched
This past September, the Canadian War Museum, in partnership with the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Canadian Culture Online Program, launched a searchable archive of 144,000 newspaper articles from the time of the Second World War. The articles in the collection are predominantly from the archives of The Hamilton Spectator (in addition to articles from other newspapers such as The Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Toronto Telegram, Vancouver Sun, Winnipeg Tribune and Ottawa Citizen.) During the Second World War, the staff of the Spectator kept a monumental record of the war, collecting articles and organizing them by subject. They originally donated the Second World War archive to the Government of Canada for research purposes in 1952 and the collection was later transferred to the Canadian War Museum.
Access the archive (which is in pdf format)
Access more information about the Hamilton Spectator and its archive

3. The Hamilton Spectator @ The BRAIN
Did you know that you can access Hamilton Spectator archives from The BRAIN? A five year backfile of the Hamilton Spectator is available! Go to the Databases page and select Virtual News Library. There you will find access to five newspapers from our local area. In addition to The Hamilton Spectator, there are: The Guelph Mercury, The Cambridge Reporter, The Record (Waterloo), and The Toronto Star. The advantage of using this database over the individual web sites of each publication is that you can search one or all at once and you can also specify date ranges to search: 5 years back, 2 years, 12 months, 6 months, 3 months, 1 month, 7 days or today (many free newspaper web sites offer only a limited backfile.) Also, the search engine is robust, allowing you to search the full-text of the articles, the lead paragraphs, the title, the byline or specific dates. In addition, access is free to you as a member of the Mohawk College community (as the Library pays for the subscription to the database on a yearly basis.)

If you need help or would like to see a demo of any of the web sites discussed here, please try AskTheBRAIN Live assistance is waiting to help 10am- 7pm Monday to Thursday and 10am – 5pm on Friday.

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